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Discussion on Mottles: Part 4
Whiteside Subcategory


By: Bob Christman
JUDGING MOTTLES FOR MARKINGS.

PART 4 - WHITESIDE SUBCATEGORY.
General observations – Technically a whiteside marking is not a mottle marking. There are no white feathers interspersed with colored feathers, or colored feathers interspersed with white feathers as in the other mottle subcategories. But because whitesides are bred from shield mottles they have traditionally been shown with the mottles and our present standard carries on that tradition.

The only colors presently shown are red, gold and yellow. Someday when the whiteside factor in Danish Highfliers is transferred into our Wests we will see black whitesides shown.

Whitesides are one of the more difficult colors to raise and as a result few if any breeders intentionally raise them. Most whitesides shown today are the occasional result of a shield mottle to shield mottle mating where the wingshield has gone primarily white or all white. I suspect that most whitesides probably have two genes for grizzle and that is why the wingshields are so white, and also why the white tends to extend into the underbelly, hocks and muffs. If someone wanted to raise whitesides intentionally they could be reproduced from whiteside to whiteside or whiteside to shield mottle matings. Most whiteside are originally mismarked with color in the wingshield and some times with mixed color and white feathers in the secondaries. With regular continued plucking the colored feathers in the wingshield will eventually turn to white. The colored feathers usually have to be plucked over a period of time, sometimes as long as a couple of years, before the process of the feathers turning all white is accomplished. Before showing any remaining colored feathers, which will not leave gaps or holes in the wingshield if plucked, should be plucked. Not plucking some colored feathers out of an otherwise well marked whiteside pattern can result in the bird being bounced down in its class. Likewise, any white feathers in the colored areas, which will not leave holes or gaps in the feathering if plucked, should also be plucked. Baldheads are routinely plucked before a show to enhance their markings and the mottles (all subcategories) should also be routinely plucked before a show to enhance their markings.

Standard description for whiteside markings – “Wingshield, including finger feathers, to be white. Secondaries may be all white or all colored. Primaries and all else to be colored. Major faults: white in the tail or primaries.”

What the standard description means to me –
Markings. The wingshield should be solid white with no colored feathers in the wingshield. The rest of the bird should be all colored with no white or grizzled feathers.
Faults. White in any areas outside the wingshield should be evaluated by degree of expression. If expressed slightly, it should be considered a minor fault. If expressed to such a degree that it is not representative of the color, it should be considered a major fault. White in the tail or primaries is a major fault.

As a judge what do I expect to see in a good whiteside - The colored feathers should be all colored, no grizzling. The color should be deep and vibrant. The wingshield should be all white with no grizzled or colored feathers. Mixed white and colored feathers in the secondaries could be either a minor, medium or major fault depending on the extent the white wingshield marking is effected. A whiteside without a well marked wingshield should not be considered a good whiteside. Head - I would not expect a forehead snip. If there is a snip I would expect it to be small. A large snip would be considered a major fault. Neck - I would expect no white in the neck. If the amount of white in the neck is not pluckable I would consider it a major fault. Upper body and chest - I would expect no white in the upper body and chest. If the amount of white in the upper body and chest is not pluckable, I would consider it a major fault. Hocks - It is rare not to find white in the hocks. If the hocks are predominantly white I would consider it a major fault. (Note: Because most whitesides seem to be the result of a double dose of grizzle (two genes) there is often a lot of white to be found in the hocks. As a result of white being so common in the hocks many of our judges consider it as only a medium fault.) Muffs – I would expect no white in the muffs. If there is more than a couple of white or grizzled feathers in the muffs I would consider it a major fault.

The overall effect should be where the white wingshield in contrast to the colored body jumps out at you. If the color is not rich and vibrant it distracts from this effect. If there is color in the wingshield it distracts from this effect. If there is white feathers anywhere else other then the wingshield it distracts from this effect.

If a bird has a poor whiteside marking, has a large white snip, patches of white in the neck or body, white hocks, noticeable white in the muffs or has noticeable amount of grizzling it should be considered to have a major fault and be bounced down in its class.

Common faults - I think the most common faults found in the whitesides is a white forehead snip, white in the underbelly and hocks and colored feathers in the wingshields.

Bird 1. Red whiteside cock. This bird is a stock bird, not a show bird. It is posted just as an example of the faults that are often seen in the whiteside classes. This bird has a large white snip above the wattle on the forehead, a lot of white in the rest of the head, a large white patch on the upper neck, a mostly white underbelly extending into the lower chest, and almost all white hocks. These are all major faults and if any of them were expressed in a whiteside entered in a show it should generally result in the bird being bounced down in its class. The white in the secondaries greatly distracts from the whiteside marking and should be evaluated as a medium to major fault. It appears that the colored feathers in the center of the wingshield could be plucked before showing without leaving holes or gaps in the feathering. Of course, if plucked it is not a fault. Not plucked it would be a major fault. The white feather in the muffs would be a minor fault. The one main white muff feather should be plucked if it does not significantly affect the appearance of the muffs.

Bird 2. Red whiteside hen bred by Tony Cardoza. This bird presently has a poor wingshield pattern and probably would be bounced down in class. The single white feather in the secondaries and the red in the wing butts and lower rear edge of the wingshield greatly distracts from the desired all white wingshield. The couple of colored feathers in the middle of the wingshield should be plucked before showing. A nice characteristic about this bird is that there are only a couple of white feathers outside the wingshield area in the hocks that can be plucked creating a solid colored bird except for the wingshield. With continued plucking of the wingshield and secondaries this bird has the potential to be a very nicely marked whiteside someday.

Bird 3. Red whiteside hen bred by Evan Christman. A very nicely marked whiteside. The small white snip and the little white in the hocks is a minor fault. It appears that most of the white feathers outside the wingshield could have been plucked to enhance the appearance of the bird.

Bird 4. Red whiteside hen bred by Tony Cardoza and enhanced by Adobe. This would be the ideal whiteside marking. The entire wingshield is pure white and the rest of the bird is all colored.



 Bob Christman
Discussion on Mottles: Part 4
Whiteside Subcategory


 
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