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Discussion on Mottles: Part 5
Rosewing Subcategory


By: Bob Christman
JUDGING MOTTLES FOR MARKINGS.

PART 5 - ROSEWING SUBCATEGORY
General observations: Rosewing is a marking that was identified in the old West standards and carried forward into the present standard. It is a very difficult color to breed to the standard. I do not recall ever seeing a rosewing that ever came close to meeting, let alone meet, the present standard description for the rosewing marking. The only colors presently shown are red, gold and yellow. Someday when the shield mottle factor in Danish Highfliers is transferred into our Wests we will see black rosewings shown.

Few if any breeders intentionally raise rosewings. Most rosewings shown today are the occasional result of a shield mottle to shield mottle mating or shield mottle to self mating where the wingshield has gone primarily colored. I suspect that most rosewings probably have only one gene for grizzle along with other genetic modifiers that restricts the amount of white in the wingshields. Whatever genetic factors are limiting the expression of white to the upper wingshield in rosewings also usually limits the expression of white elsewhere in the body. The result is that most rosewings show none or very little white outside the wingshield area. If someone wanted to raise rosewings intentionally they could be probably be reproduced from rosewing to rosewing or rosewing to self matings.

Standard description for rosewing markings: "6 to 12 white feathers upon each shoulder arranged at equal distance within a circular form, both sides alike. All else colored."

What the standard description means to me:
Distribution of color. The white feathers should be distributed in a random but fairly even pattern within a circular pattern located in the shoulder area (where the wing is joined to the body).
Same both sides. The white pattern in the wingshield on one side should be about the same pattern and size on the opposite side.
Faults. White in any areas outside the rosewing pattern area on the wingshield should be evaluated by degree of expression. If expressed slightly, it should be considered a minor fault. If expressed to such a degree that it is not representative of the color, it should be considered a major fault. Though not specifically addressed in the standard white in the tail or primaries should be considered a major fault, same as in the shield mottle and whiteside categories.

As a judge what do I expect to see in a good rosewing:
Color - The colored feathers should be all colored and the white feathers all white with no peppering or grizzling. The color should be deep and vibrant.
Wingshield - The white should be interspersed throughout the circular area on the shoulder in a random but fairly even distribution. (Note: because of how the grizzle factor present in our Wests expresses itself, few, if any rosewings will have white distributed evenly within a circular pattern. Most rosewings presently shown have either a larger patch of color or some smaller irregular patches of white located in the shoulder area.)
Head - I would not expect a forehead snip. If there is a white snip I would expect it to be very small. A medium or larger snip would be considered a major fault.
Neck - I would expect no white in the neck. If the amount of white in the neck is not pluck able I would consider it a major fault.
Upper body and chest - I would expect no white in the upper body and chest. If the amount of white in the upper body and chest is not pluck able I would consider it a major fault.
Hocks - Little white is usually expressed in the hocks in rosewings. If the hocks have any significant amount of white I would consider it a major fault.
Muffs I would expect no white in the muffs. If there are more than a couple of grizzled feathers in the muffs I would consider it a major fault.

The overall effect should be where the circular white pattern in contrast to the colored bird jumps out at you. If the color is not rich and vibrant it distracts from this effect. If there is white anywhere else in the wingshield other than the shoulder it distracts from this effect. If there are white feathers anywhere else other then the wingshield it distracts from this effect.

If a bird has a poor rosewing marking, has a noticeable white snip, patches of white in the neck or body, has more then a couple of white feathers in the hocks, or any white or noticeable grizzling in the muffs should be considered to have a major fault and be bounced down in its class.

Common faults - I think the most common faults found in the rosewings are a splotchy or irregular shaped markings and grizzled feathers in the wingshields.

Bird 1. Yellow hen bred by Bob Christman. This bird would be considered to have a poor rosewing marking. The marking is not circular in shape, the white feathers are clumped and not distributed randomly, and the marking is not in the shoulder area but in the wingshield center area. The rest of the bird is solid colored as called out in the standard.

Bird 2. Yellow mottle hen bred by Brian McCormick. This bird would be considered to have a poor rosewing marking. The marking is not circular in shape and is not located in the shoulder area but in wing butt and center of the wing areas. The rest of the bird is solid colored as required by the standard.

Bird 3. Red cock bred by Doug Boyland with rosewing marking digitally created by Adobe photo software. This would be considered an excellent rosewing marking. There are 12 white feathers distributed randomly in a circular pattern. The balance of the bird is all colored.



 Bob Christman
Discussion on Mottles: Part 5
Rosewing Subcategory


 
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