News

 

Most Nefarious Betweeners


By: Bob Christman
News of most outrageous events befalls us most gracious ladies and valiant lords.   The most nefarious of the West pretenders, the Dark Betweener, and his hordes continue to spread mischief and havoc among the fancy.

Throughout Westdom the betweeners make their presence known at exhibition matches and tournaments great and small, deceiving the unknowing and the knowing alike. Their bags of tricks are wide and varied and can leave one betwixt. Even the most revered master deciders have been known to succumb to the betweener's cunning and guile, upon occasion raising them to places of merit and even great honor.

Beware Westdom citizens. To uncloak the betweeners and the great pretenders ask thyself, is the contender's cloak truly worthy of being held in high regard? Is the cloak of markings precise with color deep and true and worthy of high esteem? Or is the cloak of markings imprecise with colors muddled and therefore unworthy of our praise?

Beg thee Westdom citizens, heed the standard bearers words that markings and color are to be held in high regard. For rightfully then, only contenders wearing cloaks of markings precise and colors true are truly worthy of the deciders tribute.

Pray tell, reveal to us what a betweener be, so that they maybe uncloaked and their malady halted.

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What is a betweener?
A betweener is a new word coined to describe those colors that falls in between two color classes. In other words, a betweener would be a color that does not clearly fit the color description of either of the two color classes it happens to fall between.

Probably the West's most infamous example of a betweener would be the whiteside/shield mottle betweeners. This is a bird that has too much color in the wingshield to be a good whiteside and has too little color in the wingshield to be a good shield mottle. The color is not a good whiteside and it is not a good shield mottle, it falls somewhere in between. (They are infamous because, too the chagrin of many, they have had some major wins over the years).

Another common betweener is the velvet/t-pattern betweener. This is a bird that does not have enough t-pattern lacing to be good t-pattern but has too much t-pattern lacing to be a good velvet. For again, it is a betweener because it does not truly fit either color class but falls somewhere in between.

Some other examples of betweeners would be t-pattern/checkers, red bar/silver red bars, and velvets/kites.

If someone is asking themselves if a bird is a kite or is it a velvet and trying decide which color class to enter it in, then most likely it is a betweener.

Betweeners by the above definition have major marking or color faults. If they clearly do not fit in the color class they are shown in they are certainly not representative of that color and should be placed down accordingly.

The betweeners in the shows are often exceptional birds other than their color or markings. The exhibitor may recognize that the color or markings are not right but they are such nice birds otherwise they still enter them. Then sometimes judges will become so captivated with them that they ignore the color or marking faults and pick them anyway, something that sometimes seems easy to do. (At Louisville this year there was an exceptional blue velvet/t-pattern pattern bird that was an exceptional bird other then it had too much lacing to be a good velvet but too little lacing to be a good t-pattern, a definite betweener. It was a really nice bird and I had to continually remind myself that it had a major marking fault.)

Regardless of how nice betweeners maybe otherwise they are still betweeners with major marking and/or color faults. Betweeners belong in either the breeding pen or the cull pen. Betweeners really do not belong in the show pen and they definitely do not belong in the winners circle.
Throughout Westdom the betweeners make their presence known at exhibition matches and tournaments great and small, deceiving the unknowing and the knowing alike. Their bags of tricks are wide and varied and can leave one betwixt. Even the most revered master deciders have been known to succumb to the betweener?s cunning and guile, upon occasion raising them to places of merit and even great honor.

Beware Westdom citizens. To uncloak the betweeners and the great pretenders ask thyself, is the contender?s cloak truly worthy of being held in high regard? Is the cloak of markings precise with color deep and true and worthy of high esteem? Or is the cloak of markings imprecise with colors muddled and therefore unworthy of our praise?

Beg thee Westdom citizens, heed the standard bearers words that markings and color are to be held in high regard. For rightfully then, only contenders wearing cloaks of markings precise and colors true are truly worthy of the deciders tribute.

Pray tell, reveal to us what a betweener be, so that they maybe uncloaked and their malady halted.

****************************************

What is a betweener?
A betweener is a new word coined to describe those colors that falls in between two color classes. In other words, a betweener would be a color that does not clearly fit the color description of either of the two color classes it happens to fall between.

Probably the West?s most infamous example of a betweener would be the whiteside/shield mottle betweeners. This is a bird that has too much color in the wingshield to be a good whiteside and has too little color in the wingshield to be a good shield mottle. The color is not a good whiteside and it is not a good shield mottle, it falls somewhere in between. (They are infamous because, too the chagrin of many, they have had some major wins over the years).

Another common betweener is the velvet/t-pattern betweener. This is a bird that does not have enough t-pattern lacing to be good t-pattern but has too much t-pattern lacing to be a good velvet. For again, it is a betweener because it does not truly fit either color class but falls somewhere in between.

Some other examples of betweeners would be t-pattern/checkers, red bar/silver red bars, and velvets/kites.

If someone is asking themselves if a bird is a kite or is it a velvet and trying decide which color class to enter it in, then most likely it is a betweener.

Betweeners by the above definition have major marking or color faults. If they clearly do not fit in the color class they are shown in they are certainly not representative of that color and should be placed down accordingly.

The betweeners in the shows are often exceptional birds other than their color or markings. The exhibitor may recognize that the color or markings are not right but they are such nice birds otherwise they still enter them. Then sometimes judges will become so captivated with them that they ignore the color or marking faults and pick them anyway, something that sometimes seems easy to do. (At Louisville this year there was an exceptional blue velvet/t-pattern pattern bird that was an exceptional bird other then it had too much lacing to be a good velvet but too little lacing to be a good t-pattern, a definite betweener. It was a really nice bird and I had to continually remind myself that it had a major marking fault.)

Regardless of how nice betweeners maybe otherwise they are still betweeners with major marking and/or color faults. Betweeners belong in either the breeding pen or the cull pen. Betweeners really do not belong in the show pen and they definitely do not belong in the winners circle.

 Bob Christman
Most Nefarious Betweeners


 
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